Turning tables: learning from my students

Today I am in a writing contest over at Expats Blog. It would be really wonderful if you could go over and read my piece (as well as the other 24 submissions) and comment on/share my post if you so desire. You can also browse around and check out stuff from other expats leaving on a total of 112 different countries. Pretty cool.

It’s such a weird thing writing personal stuff and putting it out there, yet I continue to do it. Glutton for punishment, I am!

 

Here’s a little excerpt…

gugeegue marshall islands birthday worldteach

On Gugeegue with some of my drama students, 2007

Miss Ashley, Miss Sheets, Ashley teacher…..I get called a lot of things. I’ve taught English as a second or foreign language in quite a few different countries over the past seven years, and my work in international schools has given me access to students from more countries than I can remember. And these students have all had different names for me. In South Korea it was Ashley teacher (usually pronounced “Ash-uh-lee teach-uh!” by the little ones in my kindergarten class). In the sweltering Marshall Islands it was Miss Ashley. My Somali students referred to me simply, respectfully, as “Miss”. 

Being in a room full of rambunctious 5 year old Koreans, all speaking their mother tongue and running amuck with the level of energy that is generally afforded to those of their age, was never something I expected in life. Nor did I ever expect to spend a year of my life teaching largely uninspired but utterly delightful island kids on a tiny piece of land the size of a football field (the same kids who couldn’t stand grammar lessons, but serenaded me with ukulele singalongs and shared their ramen/kool-aid mixtures with me). It just goes to show that if anything can be said about teaching English abroad, it’s that it is never, ever, dull!

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You can go here to read the rest.  Also I believe there is a prize for best comment, so feel free to give it a go and get creative! A haiku maybe? Everybody loves a good haiku!

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